Previous month:
March 2014
Next month:
May 2014

April 2014

FREE TICKETS: Marco Benevento at SubCulture

image from www.parisdjs.com

NOTE: This contest has ended.

Experimental rock and jazz pianist Marco Benevento comes to SubCulture on Friday, April 18, at 7:30 p.m., and FoM is giving away a pair of free tickets to the show! 

Sure to be a show you won't want to miss, Benevento is known for performances that "reverberate with pulsating dance rock energy." 

For your chance to win:

1. Email free@feastofmusic.com    -OR-

2. Tweet #FreeTickets @marcobenevento @feastofmusic  (and don't forget to follow us!)   -OR-

3. Head to our Facebook page and COMMENT on our giveaway post! Note: "Likes" on their own will not be considered valid entries.

 


FREE TICKETS: S. Carey and White Hinterland at LPR

image from s3.amazonaws.com

NOTE: This contest has ended.

Ambient indie folk artist S. Carey (Sean Carey) co-headlines with indie dream-pop singer White Hinterland (Casey Daniel) at (le) poisson rouge on Wednesday, April 16, at 10:30 p.m., and FoM is giving away a pair of free tickets to the show! 

Carey and Hinterland are currently touring in support of their recently released albums, Range of Light and Baby (respectively). 

For your chance to win:

1. Email free@feastofmusic.com    -OR-

2. Tweet #FreeTickets @scareymusic @feastofmusic  (and don't forget to follow us!)   -OR-

3. Head to our Facebook page and COMMENT on our giveaway post! Note: "Likes" on their own will not be considered valid entries.

 


Preview: Broadway Chamber Players at St. Malachy's – "The Actors' Chapel"

Broadway Chamber Players

After a fanstastic debut performance at St. Patrick's Cathedral in January, Broadway Chamber Players is bringing their musicians' Broadway chops to the classical scene once more, this Monday, April 14, at 5:30 p.m. Staying a bit closer to home than their last presentation, "Black and Blue" will bring the jazz-inflected music of Gershwin, Wiedoeft, Milhaud, and more to the Theater District's St. Malachy's—commonly reffered to as "The Actors' Chapel."

Tickets start at $10.00, and are available here. And frankly—you're not going to hear these accomplished reed doublers play their regular gigs in the pits of Wicked, Matilda, Aladdin, or Cinderella for any less than that!


The Tallis Scholars Proves Redundant at Church of St. Mary the Virgin

by Michael Cirigliano II

Miller Theater, Tallis Scholars, Church of St. Mary the Virgin

Photo credit: Matthew Murphy

For everything The Tallis Scholars has achieved in its niche market of Renaissance polyphony, it must also be terribly constricting to work within such a singular musical form. Founded by director Peter Phillips 40 years ago, the English group has become synonymous with the choral music of 15th- and 16th-century Europe, consistently setting the standards for the repertoire in terms of both musicological scholarship and performance style. But whereas other "period" ensembles can traverse a wide range of musical styles within a single period—think of John Eliot Gardiner's Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique, who perform works ranging from courtly Beethoven through to fiery Verdi—Renaissance polyphony isn't as diverse a genre, which can leave an entire program feeling a bit redundant.

Such was the case with The Tallis Scholars' performance at Times Square's Church of St. Mary the Virgin Saturday night, this season's final installment of Miller Theatre's Early Music series. With works from Josquin Desprez, Cipriano de Rore, John Sheppard, Michael Nyman, and the group's eponymous composer, Thomas Tallis, the two-hour-plus evening provided consistently high musical standards but couldn't produce the highs and lows needed for a true musical journey.

Desprez's Praeter rerum seriem, a Christmas motet written during the composer's late period, began the program, an interesting work that presents a simple plainchant melody before quickly morphing into ever-evolving permutations that leave the opening strain almost unrecognizable by the work's end. Despite the boomy acoustics in the church, the ensemble's sense of timing and articulation was pristine—no small feat given the dense construction of the material and the intricate canons laced throughout.

Continue reading "The Tallis Scholars Proves Redundant at Church of St. Mary the Virgin" »